SYLLABUS  AGE OF THE REFORMATION           (A310-001)  SPRING SEMESTER  2004
INSTRUCTOR:  ROBERT S. GERLICH, S.J. MWF 1:30 - 2:20 PM [Bobet 214B]
COURSE OBJECTIVES 
TEXT AND METHOD
GRADING PERCENTAGES AND GRADE SCALE 
TESTS 
CLASS ETIQUETTE AND EXPECTATIONS 
APPOINTMENTS AND CONSULTATION

 
 
CL DATE  TOPIC   TEXT (Pgs) LINKS & STUDY AIDS
1
JAN   12
INTRODUCTION TO COURSE 
2
         14
The Reformation in Historical Perspective
3
         16
The Crisis of the Early Church 
         19
MARTIN LUTHER KING HOLIDAY
4
         21
Church and State Relations -- Late Roman Empire
5
         23
Church and State Relations -- Early Middle Ages
6
         26
Church and State Relations -- High Middle Ages
7
         28
Church and State Relations  -- Late Middle Ages Lecture Material
8
         30
The Intellectual Challenges of the Late Middle Ages Lindberg, 1-24
9
FEB   02
The Religion of the People of Europe
10
         04
Social Conditions and Religious Unrest Jensen, 9-44 
11
         06
Humanism and the Reforming Impulse  Lindberg, 1-24
12
         09
Martin Luther and the German Upheaval Jensen, 53-85
13
         11
Reformers' Message: Renaissance Values in Reformation Clothing Lindberg, 144-162
14
         13
The Expanding ReformationZwingli and the Swiss Reformation Jensen, 93-123
15             16 Zwingli and the Swiss Reformation Lindberg, 103-121
16
         18
FIRST EXAMINATION  
17
         20
Calvin and International Protestantism Jensen, 129-149
Feb 23-27 MARDI GRAS HOLIDAYS
18
Mar    01 
The English Reformation --From Henry VIII to Mary Tudor Jensen, 159-183
19
         03
From Mary Tudor to the Elizabethan Compromise Jensen, 303-328
20
         05
The Radical Reformation -- The Anabaptists Lindberg, 124-142  
21
         08
Reformation in the Netherlands: Politics and Religion Lindberg, 204-216
22
         10
Spain and the Protestant Challenge: Politics and Religion Jensen, 264-295
23
         12
Reformation in France:  Politics and Religion Jensen, 229-256
24
         15
Reformation and the Common Man Lindberg, 83-101
25
         17
Women and Family in the Age of the Reformation
26
         19
 Reformation in Scandanavia and Eastern Europe  
27
         22
READING AND RESEARCH DAY -- NO CLASS MEETING
28
         24
SECOND EXAMINATION
29
         26
Social Welfare and Education Lindberg, 67-81
30
         29
The Early Catholic Reformation Jensen, 191-200
         31
The Society of Jesus  Jensen, 200-208
32
Apr    02
The Council of Trent -- Reform and Consolidation Jensen, 208-225
     05-09 EASTER HOLIDAYS
33
          12
The Catholic Counter-Reformation Lindberg, 240-258
34
          14
Science and Culture in the Age of the Reformation Jensen, 375-406
35
          16
Art in the Age of the Reformation Jensen, 403-414
36
          19
The Thirty Years War Jensen, 451-476
37
          21
READING AND RESEARCH DAY -- NO CLASS MEETING
38
          23
Social Disruption and the Witch Hunt Craze Jensen, 339-374
39
          26
Why the Reformation Happened?  
40
          28
Legacies & Challenges to the "Confessional" Age Lindberg, 260-280
41
          30
Contemporary Attempts at Reconciliation
42
          03
THIRD EXAMINATION 
43
          05
Course Evaluation and Discussion RESEARCH PAPER DUE
FINAL EXAMINATION:          FRI       7 May       2:00 - 4:00 pm
 

 
COURSE OBJECTIVES
1. to understand the nature of the changes wrought by the Reformation in European history
2. to synthesize and reflect upon the primary sources
3. to grasp and explain the events, concepts, and relationships which have contributed to social, political and religious change
4. to gain a deeper understanding of the nature of Church - State relations
5. to develop the critical thinking necessary to contribute effectively to class discussion 

 
 
TEXT and METHOD
1. Reformation Europe. Age of Reform and Revolution. 2nd edition, by De Lamar Jensen; The European Reformations Sourcebook,by Carter Lindberg.
2. Method: Lecture, Discussion of Primary Source materials, Research on a Topic within the Reformation Period

 
 
GRADING PERCENTAGES and GRADE SCALE
1. GRADING PERCENTAGE
a.  Research Paper 20%
b.  Final Examination 20%
c.  Class Participation 10%
c.  Sectional Examinations 50%
2. GRADE SCALE
A      90-100
B+     85-89.9
B       80-84.9
C+     75-79.9
C       70- 74.9
D+     65-69.9
D       60-64.9

 
 
TESTS
Examinations
a. Three sectional examinations are given in the semester. The examinations are non-culminative in nature. Thus, each exam covers approximately a third of the semester's material. The three grades are equally weighted, consequently the average of the three grades constitute 50% of the overall grade.
b. The examinations are in essay format.  If a student has an "A" average prior to the final exam, he/she may chose to accept his/her standing grade and NOT take the Final Exam.
c. Students with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations in this class should contact Disability Services at 865-2990 as soon as possible so that warranted accommodations can be implemented in a timely fashion. Disability Services are located in the Academic Enrichment Center, Monroe Hall 405.

 
 
CLASS ETIQUETTE AND EXPECTATIONS
1.   Attendance
a. Vegetative presence serves neither the learning experience nor is it a profitable use of time. If you are not in the mood to think and are not interested in contributing to the discussion, I would suggest that it would be better to use your time in some other more profitable endeavor outside of the classroom.
b. Please be prompt.
2. Etiquette
a. If you must leave early, etiquette requires that the student inform the professor prior to the beginning of class. 
b. I do not object to a student bring a beverage to help stimulate newly awakened brain cells, but please do not bring food into the classroom. Proper attire is required for class, please wear shoes, etc. Private conversations in class are very disruptive; please avoid them.
c. If you have to be absent from class, please e-mail me prior to the class meeting or see me personally about your upcoming absence.

 
 
APPOINTMENTS AND CONSULTATION
1. Office Hours
a. Office hours are held in Bobet 425 MW 10:30 -11:30 pm; TTH 10:00-11:30 am or by appointment.
b. Due to meetings and extensive committee obligations, it is possible that on a given day conflicts will arise. Thus, it is prudent to call ahead and make sure that I am indeed available and in my office. Although I make a particular effort to be in my office during the scheduled hours, I do spend most of my day in the office. Please feel free to stop by any time to discuss your class grades, study habits, etc. I am always delighted to offer any help that I can.
2. Office Telephone and E-mail
a. (504) 865-2570 
b. email address: gerlich@loyno.edu